Zebrium Blog

How Fluentd collects Kubernetes metadata

As part of my job, I recently had to modify Fluentd to be able to stream logs to our (Zebrium) Autonomous Log Monitoring platform. In order to do this, I needed to first understand how Fluentd collected Kubernetes metadata. I thought that what I learned might be useful/interesting to others and so decided to write this blog.

As part of my job, I recently had to modify Fluentd to be able to stream logs to our (Zebrium) Autonomous Log Monitoring platform. In order to do this, I needed to first understand how Fluentd collected Kubernetes metadata. I thought that what I learned might be useful/interesting to others and so decided to write this blog.

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Part 1 - Machine learning for logs

In our last blog we discussed the need for Autonomous Monitoring solutions covering the three pillars of observability (metrics, traces and logs). At Zebrium we have started with logs (but stay tuned for more). This is because logs generally represent the most comprehensive source of truth during incidents, and are widely used to search for the root cause.

In our last blog we discussed the need for Autonomous Monitoring solutions to help developers and operations users keep increasingly large and complex distributed applications up and running.

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Getting anomaly detection right by structuring logs automatically

Observability means being able to infer the internal state of your system through knowledge of external outputs. For all but the simplest applications, it’s widely accepted that software observability requires a combination of metrics, traces and events (e.g. logs). As to the last one, a growing chorus of voices strongly advocates for structuring log events upfront.

 

Observability means being able to infer the internal state of your system through knowledge of external outputs. For all but the simplest applications, it’s widely accepted that software observability requires a combination of metrics, traces and events (e.g. logs). As to the last one, a growing chorus of voices strongly advocates for structuring log events upfront. Why? Well, to pick a few reasons - without structure you find yourself dealing with the pain of unwieldy text indexes, fragile and hard to maintain regexes, and reactive searches. You’re also impaired in your ability to understand patterns like multi-line events (e.g. stack traces), or to correlate events with metrics (e.g. by transaction ID).

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