The Future of Monitoring is Autonomous

Monitoring today is extremely human driven. The only thing we’ve automated with monitoring to date is the ability to watch for metrics and events that send us alerts when something goes wrong. Everything else: deploying collectors, building parsing rules, configuring dashboards and alerts, and troubleshooting and resolving incidents, requires a lot of manual effort from expert operators that intuitively know and understand the system being monitored.

TL;DR

Monitoring today puts far too much burden on DevOps - requiring too much time and skill to build and maintain complex dashboards and fragile alert rules. Fortunately unassisted machine learning can be used to autonomously detect and find the root cause of critical incidents. Please read about it below, or try our free Autonomous Monitoring Platform now and start auto-detecting incidents in less than 5 minutes.

 

The Longer Version

 

Monitoring today is extremely human driven. The only thing we’ve automated with monitoring to date is the ability to watch for metrics and events that send us alerts when something goes wrong. Everything else: deploying collectors, building parsing rules, configuring dashboards and alerts, and troubleshooting and resolving incidents, requires a lot of manual effort from expert operators that intuitively know and understand the system being monitored.

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Using machine learning to detect anomalies in logs

At Zebrium, we have a saying: “Structure First”. We talk a lot about structuring because it allows us to do amazing things with log data. But most people don’t know what we mean when we say the word “structure”, or why it allows for amazing things like anomaly detection. This is a gentle and intuitive introduction to “structure” as we mean it.

At Zebrium, we have a saying: “Structure First”. We talk a lot about structuring because it allows us to do amazing things with log data. But most people don’t know what we mean when we say the word “structure”, or why it allows for amazing things like anomaly detection. This is a gentle and intuitive introduction to “structure” as we mean it.

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Using ML and logs to catch problems in a distributed Kubernetes deployment

It is especially tricky to identify software problems in the kinds of distributed applications typically deployed in k8s environments. There’s usually a mix of home grown, 3rd party and OSS components – taking more effort to normalize, parse and filter log and metric data into a manageable state. In a more traditional world tailing or grepping logs might have worked to track down problems, but that doesn’t work in a Kubernetes app with a multitude of ephemeral containers.

It is especially tricky to identify software problems in the kinds of distributed applications typically deployed in k8s environments. There’s usually a mix of home grown, 3rd party and OSS components – taking more effort to normalize, parse and filter log and metric data into a manageable state. In a more traditional world tailing or grepping logs might have worked to track down problems, but that doesn’t work in a Kubernetes app with a multitude of ephemeral containers. You need to centralize logs, but that comes with its own problems. The sheer volume can bog down the text indexes of traditional logging tools. Centralization also adds confusion by breaking up connected events (such as multi-line stack traces) in interleaved outputs from multiple sources.

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Structure is Strategic

We structure machine data at scale

Zebrium helps dev and test engineers find hidden issues in tests that “pass”, find root-cause faster than ever, and validate builds with self-maintaining problem signatures. We ingest, structure, and auto-analyze machine data - logs, stats, and config - collected from test runs.

 

We structure machine data at scale

 

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